Why Architects Should Publish Academic Research for Competitiveness in Global Practice

Publishing in Academic Research Journals in the Philippines by Architects is not a common thing. This is because most architects in the Philippines think that only academicians can submit academic papers. However, this is a misconception. In fact, it is good for an architect to publish academic papers even if he or she is not in the academic field. Here are some reasons why. 


1. You can improve your credentials. 

Publishing in an academic journal can improve your track record as an architect. It will show that you have more impact and you have an addition to the architecture discipline. Most famous architects like Bjarke Ingels and Zaha Hadid have published numerous write-ups in scientific journals and because of this they have become the Starchitects that they are. 

2. You can publish your passion specifically your undergraduate thesis research which you have worked so hard for. 

Most architecture students take too much time doing research for their undergraduate thesis that does not even get publish rather stays in the racks of university libraries. Publishing your academic work by further improving your thesis research and changing it into the journal format will help you get your ideas out there for the world to see. 

3. You can use this as the stepping stone for your Master's Degree application.

Getting published is one of the many qualifications to be able to get to a prestigious university that offers a Masters's Degree in Architecture and other related specializations. That is why it is important to publish academic work. My tip is to publish at least three so that you can also have a scholarship. 


4. You can use this as the basis for specialization. 

Lastly, publishing an academic paper can hep you further specialize. Because what you write is something that you are passionate about and also very knowledgeable about, it means that you are able to use it for your intended specialization and in the end people will see it as your trademark.


Before I end my article, I would like to invite all architects to submit your academic research work to the UAP Journal in this email uappublications@gmail.com

Here are the details for the call for entries. 


UAP ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL FY 2019-2020
“VISION beyond 2020”

CALL FOR ENTRIES

You are invited to submit articles, innovative project case studies, compiled research projects, and monographs related to Architecture, Interior Architecture, Information Technology, Building Information Management, Building Science, materials and technology, Urban Planning, Housing and Real Estate Development, Landscape Architecture, Green Architecture, Heritage Architecture, Vernacular Architecture, Art and History, Disaster Resilient Design and other related fields.

Bearing the theme “Vision Beyond 2020”, The concepts, designs and proposed programs of featured architects will emphasize but not be limited to the following topics:

Covid 19 themes and related research;
Sustainable and resilient master-planned communities;
Structures with respect to disaster preparedness, including evacuation;
Ideas with regards to the booming industry and eco-tourism;
Solutions addressing the needs of transport and data infrastructure; and
Other developments which will greatly benefit the society in general.

The UAP Architects’ Journal is initiated by the United Architects of the Philippines (UAP) as a publication that aims to promote unity and excellence in the professional arena by providing concerted forum and opportunities for architects in various practices, academics, researchers, as well as other professionals from all disciplines in the transformation, exchange, and criticism of inputs from research, analytical studies and other critical works related to Architecture and the building and design industry in general.

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

To be considered for publication, the submission must include:

A single-column, single-spaced, 200-250 word abstract
A single-column, unformatted, single-spaced article, 1000-4000 words (maximum) with embedded images. Quality graphics are encouraged, in color if appropriate
Both PDF and MS Word documents copies in A4-size paper (Font: Calibri 11pts)

Graphics:
One set of graphics (charts, diagrams, floor plans, photos) submitted separately either via email, CD/DVD or flash drive at a high-resolution size, at least 300 DPI, 5x7 inches, preferably in CMYK color
EPS format if a drawing/line art and preferably in RGB color
JPG format if a photograph
Not in PDF
Copy in one article must indicate placement of graphics specifically by reference number. Please limit the number of graphics to ten (10)

Submissions shall be subject to approval by the UAP Journal (Editorial Board) and shall be edited for the style and grammar only. All laws regarding plagiarism and copyrights for both text and images are strictly enforced and must be complied.

Deadline for submission of entries: EXTENDED due to the pandemic.

All materials submitted to the UAP Journal are subject to peer review. Articles will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

Work contributes to the body of architectural knowledge;
Intentions are well-articulated and their achievements are substantiated through intellectual and academic rigor;

Outcomes are identified and there is evidence of scholarly reflection on their significance; and
The work has not been published or is in the process of being referred for another publication.

REGISTRATION OF INTEREST, SUBMISSION, AND CORRESPONDENCE

Please direct any and all inquiries to:
Email Addresses: uapnational@yahoo.com  uappublications@gmail.com

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Gloryrose Dy Metilla is an Architect and a Heritage professional. In 2018, she finished the Design Summerschool from the College of Architecture and Urban Planning in Tongji University, Shanghai, China, and then her Masters in Urban and Cultural Heritage from the Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Australia with an Australia Awards Scholarship. She graduated with her Bachelor of Science in Architecture from the University of the Philippines in Mindanao in 2009. At present, she is the principal architect of Swito Architecture Designs Services. You can also visit her youtube channel, Filipina Architect

She is also the Editore for Area D of  United Architects of the Philippines Journal for 2019-2020. 




Why a Master's Degree in your 20s is Important for an Architecture Career

In the Philippines, having a master's degree in the field of architecture is not popular. Most architects think that this is only for the academics type. 

However, with the fast-paced and continually evolving world, it has become important for an architect in the Philippines to have a master's degree. Here are some of the reasons why they should have a master's degree. 


1. It can improve your design
Having a master's degree can improve the way you design because, during this time, you may be more mature than your old self when you were still an undergraduate. Possibly, you will have already experience a lot in life and therefore understand the realities of the built environment while doing your master's degree. For this reason, you are able to design better and improve your craft. 

2. It can improve your credentials 
Have a master's degree can also improve your credentials especially in bidding for new projects. Because you may be still in the early years of your career, bidding for high-value projects may be difficult. However, if you have a master's degree, clients may see you as a higher value than other architects even if they have more years of experience. A master's degree is your leverage.

3. It can help you specialize
Lastly, having a master's degree can help you specialize in the field of architecture that you really like and it will also help others see your specialty. Whether you want to be a specialist in sustainability and heritage, it is the master's degree that will help you shape the specialist that you become. 

Here are some of the Master's Degree in Architecture that you can apply to. In the Philippines, we have the University of Sto Tomas, University of San Carlos, University of the Philippines which offers a Masters's Degree in Architecture.

Here are some of the Master's Degree in Architecture and specific fields in other countries. 

Masters Of Architectural Design And History
Masters Of Architecture – Building Architecture
Masters Of Architecture – Built Environment Interiors
Masters In Building And Architectural Engineering
Masters Of Landscape Architecture
Masters Of Sustainable Architecture And Landscape Design
Masters Of Interior And Spatial Design
Masters In Urban And Cultural Heritage
Masters Of Construction Management
Masters Of Architectural Science – Audio And Acoustics
Masters Of Architectural Science – High-Performance Buildings
Masters Of Design – Design Innovation
Masters Of Design – Strategic Design
Masters Of Heritage Conservation
Masters Of Urban Design
Masters Of Urban And Regional Planning
Masters Of Urbanism

Copy and paste the master's degree program that you are interested in and paste it in google. A lot of master's degrees will show up on the search list. You can also type in Scholarships for a Masters degree if you want to proceed with masters with a scholarship. 



ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Gloryrose Dy Metilla is an Architect and a Heritage professional. In 2018, she finished the Design Summerschool from the College of Architecture and Urban Planning in Tongji University, Shanghai, China, and then her Masters in Urban and Cultural Heritage from the Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Australia with an Australia Awards Scholarship. She graduated with her Bachelor of Science in Architecture from the University of the Philippines in Mindanao in 2009. At present, she is the principal architect of Swito Architecture Designs Services. You can also visit her youtube channel, Filipina Architect


How to Respond to Clients Who want Cheap or Free Design


Responding to clients who ask for free design or cheap design is every architect's dilemma. Most architects get insulted by this scenario but do not know how to respond to it. 

I interviewed  Principal and Managing Partner of Asian Architects / Former Chairman, Green Architecture Advocacy Philippines, FUAP, APEC Architect, Associate of AIA, Ar. Mike Guerrero and he has shared some valuable things on how to respond to clients who want a cheap design or free design.



What do you respond to when you are asked for free design?

Architect Mike Guerrero responded to this most practically. He said, "If it is a regular project, there has to be a fee - and the simplest way to reason out with the client it that architecture is the way I earn a living (hanap buhay)"


Ar. Mike Guerrero

However, he also noted that he does pro bono projects, especially for humanitarian reasons. According to him, "I do give pro-bono design service and consultancy when the project is for humanitarian reasons, or for projects that involve the BoP (Base of the Pyramid)." 


What do you respond to when a client asks to haggle at a much lower price?


Architect Mike Guerrero answered this by using a formula. He said, "You should have an idea of your base price to deliver the project before you tackle negotiations for your fee.  My formula is to calculate first your hourly rate to be able to cover all your office and living expenses.  Then estimate the time it will take you to finish the project design, then double it (to allow for changes, unforeseen costs, etc). "

He then continued, "Then finally multiply the estimated time by your cost per hour, and that should give you the “direct” cost of the project.  Any fee lower than that figure will mean that you are not covering your expenses. Armed with that figure, you may now negotiate for your fee.  Everyone loves a discount, so give in a bit as long as you do not go lower than your “direct” cost.    And if the client still wants lower than your “direct” cost, it is better to walk away from the project - unless that project will give you several other projects … then the fee becomes a marketing tool."


What can you advise emerging architects who experience these kinds of clients?

"Focus on the value of your service first rather than the fee.  Share knowledge freely in the initial discussion, as this gives your client an idea of what value you can provide", said Ar. Mike Guerrero. 

He also emphasized, "Develop a business sense.  Know your costs, your time so you can readily justify your fee.  Do not always lean on standard fee structures in the industry."

I hope you learn from these suggestions and advice from the wisdom of Architect Mike Guerrero. I sure did and will put this into practice.

If you have other suggestions or comments, don't hesitate to comment below.



ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Gloryrose Dy Metilla is an Architect and a Heritage professional. In 2018, she finished the Design Summerschool from the College of Architecture and Urban Planning in Tongji University , Shanghai, China and then her Masters in Urban and Cultural Heritage from the Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Australia with an Australia Awards Scholarship. She graduated her Bachelors of Science in Architecture from the University of the Philippines in Mindanao in 2009. At present, she is the principal architect of Swito Architecture Designs Services.

Tips for Passing the Architecture Board Exams from Female Architects


The Licensure Exam for Architecture is coming up. Usually, it is scheduled in June and January of each year. The architecture course is one if not the most difficult course in the entire world because it entails the logical as well as the creative mind. That is why preparation is the key to nailing that exam. Usually, architecture graduates prepare for almost 6 months. In this span of 6 months, a lot of things may happen. Roller coaster of emotions tends to arise especially for female architecture graduates. Most women tend to overthink and get too emotional during these moments. Men also have these moments but most women tend to be showier with how they feel.



I interviewed four young and amazing Filipina Architects and they have shared their tips for Passing the Architecture Board Exams.  Special thanks to these Female Architects that have shared their inspiring words. 


Ar. Rochelle Rhema Caballo-Yap, PRBoA ALE June 2014 Board Topnotcher


Ar. Mary Catherine Diaz of Cat Arc Design Studio

Ar. Janina Gantuangco, Architect and Vlogger dzaneena design


Ar. Jahzeel Magdadaro (Top 6, 2013 Exam)



The tips have been divided into five sections; emotional tips, study tips, on the day of exam tips, after the exam tips, and prayer tips. 

EMOTIONAL TIPS

1. Sleep is very important
According to Ar. Mary Catherine Diaz, sleep is very important. One must maintain a Study + Sleep habit while preparing for the board exam. The POMODORO method uses a timer to cut down the study and sleep in 25 minutes length and then short breaks are added. 
This is important so that your mind has the breaks to actively absorb what you have studied. 

2. Listen to Music
According to Ar. Janina Gantuangco, it is important to listen to music. She said, "Something that's helped me through self-studying was listening to music while I was studying. When studying, I would highly recommend listening to music with no lyrics but enough beat to NOT let you fall asleep or turn your study session into a karaoke session on your bed. LOL. Now, if I ever needed to focus, there are Focus playlists on Spotify and Youtube. I usually focus more on LoFi Jazzhop music when working right now so that might work for you. Hope this helps!"


2. Take Daily Walks 
Studies suggest that taking short walks Improves your mood. It also improves balance and coordination. Take a walk daily 30 minute walks in parks or your vicinity. It is also good to take a walk in the morning at around 6 am or before sunset. 


3. Be Mindful with the food you eat
The food you eat can have a huge impact on your brain and your emotional state. Eat more protein such as meat, fish, eggs, poultry, legumes, nuts and seeds, dried beans and lentils, dairy products, and soy products. Fruits and veggies are also a must to stay healthy as well as foods rich in Omega-3. Nuts are also good for the brain and of course, drink plenty of water. Caffeine should be taken in moderation but can also help focus.

4. State of Mind
Ar. Rochelle Rhema Caballo-Yap, PRBoA ALE June 2014 Board Topnotcher said, "The board exam is just an exam. But your mindset as a future architect should already be a state of mind that you should already adapt in your everyday life in problem-solving and seeing the living environment as a whole. This is what makes learning and understanding easier. Because the comprehension of certain lessons like design concepts and guidelines; minimum standards in sidewalks, parking slots, or hallways for example; which you encounter in your everyday life; and the history of how different stages in the history of architecture has shaped the environment as it is now is something that you, as a future architect, should already be seeing everywhere. So commit to the art and science of the profession and the learning part will come easier to you. "

Ar. Janina Gantuangco also added, "One piece of advice that stuck throughout review was "You're already an architect, this is just the last exam to prove that you are one." With this advice, it was easier for me to not think of any negative thoughts (because face it, we are our own greatest critics) and therefore affecting my study/review. This licensure exam is to test and prove that you CAN design buildings in accordance with the law and fulfilling your client's needs and best interests. The key here is to "think like an architect" when taking the board exam. "


5. Have an inspiration
It is also important that you have something to be inspired. Ar. Mary Catherine Diaz mischievously said, "Lumandi ka din, Huwag puro study!" (Take time to Flirt as well. Study and Flirt!). This may seem like a joke but emotionally, this will divert your mind from overthinking and instead of thinking about your "Crush" or the very handsome and beautiful instructor or your loved ones if you are not single. 


STUDY TIPS

1. Study daily and first thing in the morning
While some people like to study in the afternoon and at night, comprehension is best attained in the morning. If you're not ready to study yet, run through the outline and read gradually until you're mind starts to absorb. 

2. Divide and Conquer
Ar. Rochelle Rhema Caballo-Yap, June 2014 Board Topnotcher said, "Be realistic but don’t be overconfident. The sooner you accept that it is IMPOSSIBLE to memorize virtually every Architectural History milestone, standard measurement, National Artist for Architecture, or Pritzker prize awardee, the sooner you can sit down and calmly map out a comprehensive study plan that is doable for you. The Question Bank is made up of thousands of questions from different reviewers and it is impossible to inject that much information for anybody. If you’re attending board reviewers, then that’s already one step of confidence in your favor. But that is not to say you should only depend on those classes alone either. See which readings/study points you can accommodate in your free time which you think are helpful and are not included in your board review curriculum. "

3. Don't Study Alone
Try once or twice a week group study with your friends. Make sure that your study mates are also enthusiastic about studying and not get distracted with "chismis" easily. 

4. Verify from the book if you are confused, avoid guessing games
Sometimes, you will get confused about the answers, so verify from the book. No guessing. Always have a reference. This is what Ar. Diaz emphasized, that it is best to go back to the reference and not depend on your understanding when it comes to studying. 

5. Master one or two areas
According to Ar. Jahzeel Magdadaro , Top 6 in the 2013 Board Exam for Architecture, "I think it is important to master one or two areas? That is what I did to pull up my grade and ultimately top the exam. "

6. Understand All computations
Ar. Magdadaro also added it is also important to "Understand the computation part because it has a huge weighted score"

7. Learn Holistically
Ar. Rochelle Rhema Caballo-Yap, June 2014 Board Topnotcher said, "Listening in a class all day is not the most effective learning environment/technique for everyone. We had classes from 8 am to 8 pm in our review centers before and by the time the last class started, everyone was already itching to go home and save what was left of their brain cells. That being said, it is very important to be a bit creative in retaining so much information in such a short period. For me what worked was rewriting notes from class into infographics; this way lecture notes become more visual in my head which helped me associate different kinds of information better. Among my review mates, we also did weekly quiz challenges to assess how well we were learning from class and group discussions. There are also video and podcast resources online in case reading or writing becomes a dragging on some days. If you can exhaust all five senses in learning, then do it. Listen to the lectures. Watch a documentary. Visit historical sites. You can even reinforce and associate information by eating certain snacks for particular topics you are having difficulties with. Just like Spongebob says, “Use your imagination”.

EXAM DAY TIP

During exam day, you may feel low in confidence. So, find something to look forward to after the exam.

AFTER EXAM DAY

According to Ar. Diaz, it is important to plan a vacation or entertainment session while waiting for the results so that you won't get too paranoid if you make it or not. It should be something unrelated and detached from the outside world. 

PRAYER TIPS
1. You do everything you can, Work your best and God will do the rest.
2. Pray Always to be calm
"Pray always to be calm"



ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Gloryrose Dy Metilla is an Architect and a Heritage professional. In 2018, she finished the Design Summerschool from the College of Architecture and Urban Planning in Tongji University , Shanghai, China and then her Masters in Urban and Cultural Heritage from the Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Australia with an Australia Awards Scholarship. She graduated her Bachelors of Science in Architecture from the University of the Philippines in Mindanao in 2009. At present, she is the principal architect of Swito Architecture Designs Services.

Why You Should Choose Local Products as Building Materials and Interior Furniture and Furnishing


Because of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic and the implications of it to the creative economy, the battle cry now for local creatives is this "Support Local" and "Choose Local". However, this tagline has been used for so long but it did not mean that much until the pandemic happened. The reason for this is possible because of the paradigm shift that this pandemic has to teach us -- that local products should be advocated for several reasons.

Here are some reasons why it is good to select local products for your interior furnishings and furniture, and architecture building materials. 

Examples of how I used it in my projects are also show in pictures to inspire you that it can be done. 
  

1. Promote Local Culture and Economy

Local products create more jobs because they are manufactured locality. It means that the city or town prospers and also the people proper. For this reason, the local culture is sustained and promoted because the economy is booming.

For example, this painting by Gilbert Miraflor, a watercolor artist based in Tagum City that we used as painting decor for the interior of a condominium unit. Because of using the works of local artist, the economy of the art of the locality strengthens. 

2. Local Products tell Story

Local products usually have a story to tell. For example, this Torogan puzzle by Balay Balay Architecture Puzzles is a story about carpenters from Indigenous communities that make toy puzzles out of traditional Mindanao Architecture. It is a perfect centerpiece to add to your decors because it is also a toy that your visitors can play with while waiting.


This centerpiece can be used in living room design or like this coffee shop me and my team designed. 

3. Local Products promote sustainability

Local products help the environment in many ways. For example, this brick from Sidlak Pinoy helps the Siltation of Pulangi River in Mindanao and makes the river vibrant again.




I and my team had the opportunity to use the bricks in one of our projects which is a three-story building. We used it as a structural brick because this brick can withstand earthquakes.

4. Local products are made with passion

Local products are made with so much passion that they come out beautiful. An example of this Bamboo Chandelier that the Bagobo Tagabawa tribe made for one of the homes I designed. 


5. Local products save you money

Because you don't need to add more freight costs, local products are cheaper. Say for example, this bamboo called 'Asper' is a way cheaper structural element than that of typical round metal. 


We used it as part of the structural element of a soon to be built school that me and my team designed.



I hope you are now inspired to use local products for your homes and buildings. Do you know any local products for architecture and interior that should be advocated? If so, shoot me an email by visiting the contact section.





ABOUT THE AUTHOR:


Gloryrose Dy Metilla is an Architect and a Heritage professional. In 2018, she finished the Design Summerschool from the College of Architecture and Urban Planning in Tongji University , Shanghai, China and then her Masters in Urban and Cultural Heritage from the Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Australia with an Australia Awards Scholarship. She graduated her Bachelors of Science in Architecture from the University of the Philippines in Mindanao in 2009. At present, she is the principal architect of Swito Architecture Designs Services.